Connect with us

Business

Next bear market will be ‘the worst in my lifetime’ — here are 3 assets he’s using for 2022 crash protection

Published

on

Jim Rogers: Next bear market will be ‘the worst in my lifetime’ — here are 3 assets he’s using for 2022 crash protection

The Santa Claus rally has brought the market to new highs as we enter 2022, but it’s important to remember that stocks don’t always go up in straight lines.

Famed investor Jim Rogers has seen quite a few bear markets in the last half century, and he fears the biggest one yet could be right around the corner.

“The next bear market will be the worst in my lifetime,” he predicted in a Q3 interview with financial advisory firm Wealthion.

To be sure, Rogers has been bearish on the U.S. stock market for years. But the multimillionaire does know a thing or two about making money in turbulent times.

Rogers co-founded the Quantum Fund with George Soros in 1973 — right in the middle of a devastating bear market. From then till 1980, the portfolio returned 4,200% while the S&P 500 rose 47%.

Here are three assets he recommends keeping in your portfolio to ride out a possible 2022 downturn — even if you’re just sprinkling some of your extra cash on them.

Silver

Silver ore

Jens Otte / Shutterstock

Rogers has long been a fan of commodities, and silver is one of his favorites.

“The all-time high for silver is $50 an ounce; now it’s $23. Why can’t silver go back to its all-time high? That’s the way markets usually work,” he says.

Investors love silver because it can be a store of value and a hedge against rising interest rates and inflation.

At the same time, it’s widely used as an industrial metal. For instance, silver is a critical component in solar panels. So with increasing solar adoption, demand for the grey metal could get another boost.

Rising prices benefit miners, so some of the easiest ways to play a looming silver boom are through companies like Wheaton Precious Metals, Pan American Silver and Coeur Mining.

Copper

Copper wire

ShutterStock

Unlike silver, which is trading at less than half its all-time high, copper hit new heights in 2021.

But Rogers continues to like copper for a very simple reason: electric vehicles.

“An electric car uses several times as much copper as a combustion engineering car, so there’s going to be huge demand for some of these metals that we didn’t have before,” he explains.

“Yes, it’s at all-time highs now, but electric cars are just getting started.”

As is the case with silver, investors can use copper miners to get exposure to the metal. Companies like Rio Tinto, Freeport-McMoRan and Southern Copper are well-positioned to capitalize on the copper boom.

To be sure, many copper miners have already enjoyed substantial rallies in their share prices.

If you’re on the fence about jumping into the metal at this point, remember you don’t have to start big. A popular trading app even allows you to buy fractions of shares with as much money as you are willing to spend.

Agriculture

Wheat field against blue sky

thayra / Twenty20

Rogers loves agricultural commodities, like sugar or corn. But this time, he’s also stressing the importance of farmland itself.

“Unless we’re going to stop wearing clothes and eating food, agriculture is going to get better. If you really, really love it, go out there and get yourself a farm and you’ll get very, very, very rich,” he says.

Indeed, farmland could be a great hedge because it’s intrinsically valuable and has little correlation with the ups and downs of the stock market.

Over the years, agriculture has been shown to offer higher risk-adjusted returns than both stocks and real estate.

The best part? You don’t need to get your hands dirty to get a piece of the action.

New platforms allow you to invest in U.S. farmland by taking a stake in the farm of your choice. You’ll earn cash income from the leasing fees and crop sales. And of course, you’ll benefit from any long-term appreciation on top of that.

A fourth alternative

Side view of a beautiful young woman studying and watching the abstract paintings and colorful canvases during a visit to the art gallery

Beach Creatives/Shutterstock

There’s one more overlooked physical asset that has little correlation with the stock market — and it might offer even bigger upside potential: fine art.

Contemporary artwork has outperformed the S&P 500 by a commanding 174% over the past 25 years, according to the Citi Global Art Market chart.

And it’s becoming a popular way to diversify because it’s a real physical asset with little correlation to the stock market.

On a scale of -1 to +1, with 0 representing no link at all, Citi found the correlation between contemporary art and the S&P 500 was just 0.12 during the past 25 years.

Investing in art by the likes of Banksy and Andy Warhol used to be an option only for the ultrarich, like Rogers. But with a new investing platform, you can invest in iconic artworks just like Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates do.

This article provides information only and should not be construed as advice. It is provided without warranty of any kind.

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Business

Teladoc Tumbled 38% After Big First-Quarter Loss. Is It Just a Pandemic Play?

Published

on

Text size

Source link

Continue Reading

Business

After pandemic drop, Canada’s detention of immigrants rises again By Reuters

Published

on


© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Two closed Canadian border checkpoints are seen after it was announced that the border would close to “non-essential traffic” to combat the spread of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at the U.S.-Canada border crossing at the Thousand Isla

By Anna Mehler Paperny

TORONTO (Reuters) – Canada is locking up more people in immigration detention without charge after the numbers fell during the pandemic, government data obtained by Reuters shows.

Authorities cite an overall rise in foreign travelers amid easing restrictions but lawyers say their detained clients came to Canada years ago.

Canada held 206 people in immigration detention as of March 1, 2022 – a 28% increase compared with March 1 of the previous year. Immigration detainees have not been charged with crimes in Canada and 68% of detainees as of March 1 were locked up because Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) fears they are “unlikely to appear” at an immigration hearing, according to the data.

The rise puts Canada at odds with Amnesty International and other human rights groups that have urged Ottawa to end its use of indefinite immigration detention, noting CBSA has used factors such as a person’s mental illness as reason to detain them.

A CBSA spokesperson told Reuters that “when the number of entries (to Canada) goes up, an increase in detention is to be expected.” CBSA has said in the past it uses detention as a last resort.

A lawyer told Reuters her detained clients have been in Canada for years.

In the United Kingdom, too, immigration detention levels rose last year after dropping earlier in the pandemic, according to government statistics. Unlike Canada, the United States and Australia, European Union member states have limits on immigration detention and those limits cannot exceed six months.

The rise in detentions puts people at risk of contracting COVID-19 in harsh congregate settings, refugee lawyers say.

Julia Sande, Human Rights Law and Policy Campaigner with Amnesty, called the increase in detentions “disappointing but not surprising,” although she was reluctant to draw conclusions from limited data.

The number of immigration detainees in Canada dropped early in the pandemic, from a daily average of 301 in the fourth quarter (January through March) of 2019-20 to 126 in the first quarter (April through June) of 2020-21.

FEW NO-SHOWS AS DETENTIONS DROPPED

Detaining fewer people did not result in a significant increase in no-shows at immigration hearings – the most common reason for detention, according to Immigration and Refugee Board data.

The average number of no-shows as a percentage of admissibility hearings was about 5.5% in 2021, according to that data, compared to about 5.9% in 2019.

No-shows rose as high as 16% in October 2020, but a spokesperson for the Immigration and Refugee Board said this was due to people not receiving notifications when their hearings resumed after a pause in the pandemic.

Refugee lawyer Andrew Brouwer said the decline in detention earlier in the pandemic shows Canada does not need to lock up as many non-citizens.

“We didn’t see a bunch of no-shows. We didn’t see the sky fall … It for sure shows that the system can operate without throwing people in jail,” Brouwer said.

He added that detainees face harsh pandemic conditions in provincial jails – including extended lockdowns, sometimes with three people in a cell for 23 hours a day.

Refugee lawyer Swathi Sekhar said CBSA officials and the Immigration and Refugee Board members reviewing detentions took the risk of COVID-19 into account when deciding whether someone should be detained earlier in the pandemic but are doing so less now.

“Their position is that COVID is not a factor that should weigh in favor of release,” she said.

“We also see very, very perverse findings … [decision-makers] outright saying that individuals are going to be safer in jail.”

The Immigration and Refugee Board did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment.

Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Nasdaq futures rise as market attempts comeback from April sell-off, Meta shares soar

Published

on

Stock futures rose in overnight trading as the market shook off the April sell-off and investors reacted positively to earnings from Meta Platforms.

Futures on the Dow Jones Industrial Average added 70 points or 0.2%. S&P 500 futures gained 0.7% and Nasdaq 100 futures jumped 1.2%.

The moves came as shares of Meta surged more than 18% after hours following a beat on earnings but a miss on revenue, a sign that investors may see signs of relief in the beaten-up tech sector. Shares were down 48% on the year heading into the results.

Meanwhile, shares of Qualcomm gained 5.6% in extended trading on the back of strong earnings while PayPal rose 5% despite issuing weak guidance for the second quarter.

“I think a lot of people want to believe that earnings are going to pull us out of this, but earnings are not what got us into this,” SoFi’s Liz Young told CNBC’s “Closing Bell: Overtime” on Wednesday. “… But the reality is there are so many macro headwinds still in front of us in the next 60 days that the market is just hard to impress.”

The after-hour activity followed a volatile regular trading session that saw the Nasdaq Composite stoop to its lowest level in 2022, as stocks looked to bounce back from a tech-led April sell-off. The index is down more than 12% since the start of April.

In Wednesday’s regular trading, the tech-heavy Nasdaq ended at 12,488.93, after rising to 1.7% at session highs. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 61.75 points, or 0.2%, to 33,301.93 propped up by gains from Visa and Microsoft, while the S&P 500 added 0.2% to 4,183.96.

Investors await big tech earnings on Thursday from Apple, Amazon and Twitter, along with results from Robinhood. Jobless claims are also due out Thursday.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending